Radiometric dating questions contact dating

These tree ring variations will appear in all trees growing in a certain region, so scientists can match up the growth rings of living and dead trees.Using logs recovered from old buildings and ancient ruins, scientists have been able to compare tree rings to create a continuous record of tree rings over the past 2,000 years.The resulting layers, called varves, give scientists clues about past climate conditions.For example, an especially warm summer might result in a very thick layer of sediment deposited from the melting glacier.

For example, layers form within glaciers because there tends to be less snowfall in the summertime, allowing a dark layer of dust to accumulate on top of the winter snow (Figure 11.23).Thinner varves can indicate colder summers, because the glacier doesn’t melt as much and carry as much sediment into the lake.While tree rings and other annual layers are useful for dating relatively recent events, they are not of much use on the vast scale of geologic time.For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.The main thing is that it's consistent with other forms of dating.And one thing that the young Earth creationists need to explain if they're going to be down on radiometric dating--why do all subterranean pieces of dead organic matter have lower relative abundances of Carbon-14 than ones exposed to the atmosphere?

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