Dating video game addict

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A report, prepared by mental health experts at Oxford University, Johns Hopkins University, Stockholm University and the University of Sydney, sponsored by The Association for UK Interactive Entertainment, and supported by 22 video game industry trade organizations including the Entertainment Software Association of the United States and Interactive Software Federation of Europe, asserts that while there may be potential addiction associated with video gaming, it is premature to consider it a disorder without further study, given the stigmatization that video games are perceived as, and request WHO use caution when finalizing the ICD draft.

Because few clinical trials and no meta-analyses have been completed, research is still in the preliminary stages for excessive gaming treatment.

Contradictions in research examining video game addictiveness may reflect more general inconsistencies in video game research.According to lead investigator Richard Ryan, they believe that players play for more reasons than fun alone.Ryan, a motivational psychologist at Rochester, says that many video games satisfy basic psychological needs, and players often continue to play because of rewards, freedom, and a connection to other players. D., head of the TV and Media Committee of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, stated in a 2007 press release that "...The fact that there is no end to the game can feel rewarding for some, and hence players are further engaged in the game.Ferguson, Coulson and Barnett in a meta-analytic review of the research, concluded that the evidence suggests that video game addiction arises out of other mental health problems, rather than causing them.The most effective treatments seem to be, as with other addictions and dependencies, a combination of psychopharmacology, psychotherapy and twelve-step programs.

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